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a spending cut plan. he has an energy plan. he's got to make it clear. he's got to explain to people the connection between his plans and the economic recovery that we have not yet had. that's a tall order for romney. and he's going to have to fight hard for it while the, of course is attacking him. >> you said earlier i was watching kudlow and company, you said the first impression is important. he's got to swing right away. you think he'll do that? >> that's my hunch. i've seen this before. aggressive. he's got to put this sort of line in the sand. here's what i believe. and here's what he believes. and there's a big choice in this election. he is the guy who wants redistribution. i'm the guy who wants growth. he's the guy who wants government centered economy. i'm the guy for free enterprise. he's got to say that. but it's doubly hard because he's got to put meat on the bones of his tax and spend policy. to this day, people are not quite sure what mitt romney's policies are. the president doesn't have policies. romney does, but we don't understand them. >> a debate is never a good
changes to elements of obamacare that could help hospitals. we should point out energy is very strong today. that, of course, has been one of the leaders for stocks this year. they are powering the market higher as well today with the dow just off the highs, up 86 points. the nasdaq's up 12 points right now at 3148. the s&p is up 10-plus points right now at 1461. maria. >> all right, bill. the minutes from the federal reserve september policy meeting today out shedding little new light on the fed's future plans, but of course tomorrow's september jobs report will off more clues about the health of the economy. we're going to get some thoughts about what to expect out of the jobs numbers and from this rally. >> everybody is on board. steve, how about some of the hits, runs, and errors from those feds minutes? it didn't move the markets to any great degree today. >> i think we knew where people stood. the voting members are more or less in favor of the policy that came out, which was the one, the open-ended quantitative easing. the non-voters, there are more objections there. that's whe
. the hang seng gained half a percent today. energy rallied. global clothing supplier is in talks to buy new york based synergy world flight. the nikkei edged up to a week high, but lost 7% on on the week. down beat earnings reports, plunging sales in china due to the territorial backlash. the boj decided to keep its rates as expected. pc makers extending a losing streak, but media tech gained 2% on strong earnings growth outlook. south korea kospi also closed marginally in the green. samsung electronics had a volatile session after reporting record q3 operating profit, ending higher by 0.2%, but l.g. display tumbled 4.5% after a downgrade on profitability concerns. australian miners and banks leapt support to the sx 200. sensex bucking the upward trend, now lower by 0. 7%. back to you, ross. >> okay, thanks for that. so china shares getting back to action on monday. that's after a holiday week. investors will get a chance to react to the unspiraling pmi data for september. what can we expect -- the chinese market's been a big underperformer this year. can we expect when we get back to actio
and energy a little later on. >>> first, as you probably know, a grim outlook for hp sent shares down 13% yesterday. ceo meg whitman expects revenues and profits for the tech giant to decline in the near term saying unprecedented executive turnovers led to inconsistent strategic choices. our david faber is with meg whitman. david, good morning to you. >> reporter: thanks very much, carl. of course, well, you can certainly give them credit perhaps for transparency, hewle hewle hewlett-packard yesterday laying out a plan tofor remaking the company for next year they're calling a fix and rebuild year. as you said, the stock took a hit on that news. we are joined by the ceo of hewlett-packard, meg whitman joins us from headquarters in palo alto. as always, very much appreciate your willingness to come on in what are seemingly very difficult times. you and i sat down a little more than a year ago when you first joined the company. and i guess my first question would simply be what took you so long? a year is quite a while in the history of a company, certainly one that seems to be in some dis
're in the expansion camp, you want financials, energy, materials. in the contraction camp, you're generally on the defensive side. the trade everybody's been talking about, jim you alluded to it, it's to play the u.s. market, play autos, housing, consumer staples. i call it the home depot trade. it's been a monster. that's the classic trade to play in these circumstances. i have a couple of problems with this. number one, cyclicals have outperformed defensive names in the last couple of months since this has been a very popular notion out there. since june overall, earnings and stocks have been somewhat negatively correlated. we've seen earnings come down and yet the stock markets continue to move up. in the last few weeks, really hold right near its highs. you can argue and there is certainly truth to that that that's because we have q.e. 3, because we've got the ecb in the market. but i look at the facts of where the market is, not necessarily what's been moving it every minute. that's what i see right now. today, the european bailout fund is coming into effect. if spain keeps going along
, government decides, you know, the future is green energy and throw a lot of money at any small company that gets in the green energy field that creates a lot of problems. load up on debt. they don't -- they lack market discipline. they expand capacity beyond demand and what you end up with is sol lynn draft. >> so, what could government do effectively to help not the small young companies, necessarily but the smaller, fast-growing companies? what in your article you call the gazelles? >> the gazelles. one thing could you do is think about what growth companies do, they are always expanding, outgrow their office, their factory, what happens when they do that they run into a lot of luke roarcracy, building permits, environmental impact statements. what government can do is clear out the bureaucracy, take a concierge approach. >> let us help you that helps you be local then rather than state or federal right? >> that's right. most of the on obstacles are local. >> feed the gazelles but not with cheap capital government subsidies that causes those growth companies to take their eye off the
in energy, food. >> absolutely right. and what's critical is that everybody now believes there will be some extra inflationary pressure in the system and that's extremely good news. luckily i think the risks are off the table and one can be supportive of equities in terms of higher valuations until inflation gets in excess of 4 percentage points, at which point people begin to worry about what will happen to the quality of earnings. >> the key thing here is the corporate take of gdp has never been at such a high level versus -- and wage earners take gdp as a pretty low level on a historical basis. i suppose the question is that going to remain or is there anything that will tip the employee share back? at which point things will change. >> you're right, it's pivotal to the levels and whether they can be maintained. there are two factors that allow me to feel more confident. first is the government policies are pro recovery coming from corporate as opposed to try and get workers to have higher incomes workers themselves don't have price impact power in the marketplace. global trend is still
the deficit. >> there were also some notable exchanges about jobs, health care, energy industry subsidies and regulation, all of these things got deeper than some people had been expecting. we'll talk about those topics with john harwood. but if you were watching, as they headed in a 70% -- >> down from 80 the day before. >> right now it's down to about 66% in trade obviously suggesting romney got a big boost. >> mini flash crash. >> among our political guests this morning ready to talk about the road to election today, arianna huffington will be our guest host. huffington "post" obviously has a left bent, but it was declaring romney won the debate. ken duberstein will join us, as well. >> i was reading some of your tweets last night, john, and i liked your tweet. i tell you what i took away from the entire debate because i want to let you say it, but i saw what's possible in a life spent without any alcohol. i saw what i could have possibly been -- i saw how i could have possibly been able to talk if i had all the brain cells that i started with. and that was what i came away with. that
energy sector to hold 24 hour strike in the energy sector from 19:00. 21:00 cet. >>> coming up next, bae major shareholder throws something in the works. we'll have the details. >>> world bank has slashed its growth outlook for china and developing asia. the british chancellor has told cnbc the uk is getting it it right when it comes to tackling debt and will announce more spending cuts within the hour. plus the b chlt e aae and eads on on a knife edge. bigger shareholder opposes the deal. and we'll talk about that now. bae biggest shareholder invesco has said it has significant reservations about a tie up with the eads. it cited concerns the merger could backen bae's position in the united states. over the weekend, phillip hammond said it could veto any planned merger. hammond said the uk will block the deal if the french or german governments have too much of a controlling stake in the new firm. joining us for more is patricia in frankfurt. significant really, more likely to get done or more likely not? >> at the moment it seems that the stumbling blocks are more than we can do this at
governor romney talked about creating 4 million jobs by embracing an energy independence for north america. i have the ceo of the largest pipeline builder on my other show "mad money" last night. he said 4 million is reasonable, but the federal government is not being helpful. i know you favor all sort of energy, solar, fantastic. what do you say about the 4 million? >> actually, a say that we need to create more jobs across the board and particularly, highly skilled people to work in the refinery and production areas where we're finding more energy and we have to have a balance, so i'm totally for that. i encourage more a perennisship programs and training in that area. we have a high need for welders and people working in refineries and i'm all for paying for those jobs and looking at other alternative forms of energy and we have to have a balance of both. >> the unemployment rate falling below 8% for the first time since january 2009 and i'm sure the labor department was hearing about that this morning. at the same time, can you tell the american people that this 7.8 number marks the tu
of texas in the energy business, that investors are very focused on, it's a three-member utility commission that is going to make that decision. they are appointed by the governor. big debate between the president and his republican challenger, mitt romney. it wasn't that long ago that rick perry was one of the challengers for the republican nomination for president. i asked him what he thinks romney is going to do tonight and how he is going to do in tonight's debate. >> this president has to defend the debt that's being created and i think governor romney's going to do a very good job of one of growth, of one of allowing the states to be more engaged in policies. >> reporter: so, of course, he thinks romney is going to do good tonight. is he partisan, no doubt about that. we'll see how it plays out. >> david, i understand that you're still going to talk to kyle bass in a few minutes. what is top of questions in your mind? >> kyle is a big macro thinker. he also runs a hedge fund that makes stock picks like everybody else. we're also going to talk about, first off, the growing debt world w
be coming to the fore. . there's an underlying macro cramer, but a lot of changes going on. energies and energy efficiency. many aspects to it. >> other stories today, a bid to prevent another financial crisis, the review led by bank of fin len governor is expected to call for a separation of retail and investment operations. the report will also call for bonuses to be paid in debt. we'll hear from the central bank later today. meanwhile steve hester has called for banks to readjust back to a more customer focused approach. speaking at the london school of economic, he said lenders need to restore good customer service to regain trust of the public and rbs is the poster child for what went wrong in banking. and eric snyderman is suing jpmorgan. the suit partly the result of a federal mortgage task force formed in january. investors lost around $22 billion and more than 100 securities. jpmorgan says the suit involves actions taken at the behest of the u.s. government. jpmorgan stock closing up 1.2%. and "new york times" says u.s. senate will try to use the lame duck session to reach a
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of nuclear power. joining us now is scott parker, director of uk nuclear energy sector. this franco chinese con sorpgs, talking about buying the verizon nuclear venture. where do you think this leaves the transaction? >> there are only two nuclear vendors that are approved for use in the uk and that's westing house and ariva. obviously one of those is no longer available. >> they are trying to maximize the proceeds, but if you knock out one of the key buyers, is it fair to say we're not going to get the top dollar for this asset if it is eventually sold? >> i'm not sure that's true. there are two other companies that are interested. the disadvantage is they haven't got their reaction or the technologies approved, so if they do buy the nuclear company, there will be a delay of another two or three years before they could start construction on site. >> let's just delve into some of the regulatory hurdles because the chinese obviously have the cash to buy these types of assets. what hurdles do they face investing in the key strategic assets in the uk? >> if the westinghouse china state nuclear
>> bmc software. huge activity in january. >> keep an eye on linn energy and keep an eye on tim tebow. it might be this week. >> happy columbus day weekend, you guys. you know who you are. o.i., owens, illinois. >>> "power lunch" now. >> announcer: halftime is over. the second half of the trading day starts right now. >>> 7.8% unemployment. did president obama just win next month's election? jack welch says hold your horses on that 7.8% number. he doesn't really believe it. an influential florida congressman agrees. we'll talk to that congressman live and ask him on what he bases his suspicions. >>> a place in the united states where gasoline has now become hard for drivers to find. you will find out why coming up on "power lunch." >>> meantime, let's go to sue at the new york stock exchange. sue? >> the markets have been up all day long. we're up about 60 points or so on the dow jones industrial average and the big reason of course is the number that we got this morning, falling unemployment. we are now below the 8% level for the first time in four years. the question is how di
't exploited the full potential, we have alternative source of energy like solar energy or wind energy, we have agricultural output that we don't take advantage of, so there are ma so many resources and opportunities in greece, it's not a matter of the private sector doing poorly or a lack of resources, but it's rather how the state is operating, we have a big public sector as you know, we have tax evasion and we have no privatizations. if we change these things if we're not a state controlled economy but instead a private controlled economy we can see a different picture and to me by staying in the european union this is where we should concentrate. it's not how much you value the currency or you divide the labor cost but what kind of economy you are, where you wish to go. >> that's similar to the debate we seem to be having here in the united states. thanks so much for joining us this morning and congratulations on your deal and good luck with it. >> thank you very much. >> thanks for playing, sam. that was helpful. good to have you on the set. >> just look at that shot, crumbling infrastruct
're going into earnings season. let's see how they come out. energy, materials, and financials are supposed to be down and the overall down 5%. >> goldman says this is primarily about the fiscal cliff. do you agree? >> i think it's going to be very heavily earnings driven where you get china and europe in the picture too. i think fiscal cliff is partial. it will be a partial cliff. it won't be a huge dropoff. it will be a partial dropoff, in our humble opinion. we think the consumer and the low interest rates and europe and china mean you're not going to have much earnings next year. that's really our big call. >> are you scared after what he said? >> no, not at all. >> do you agree, disagree? >> it doesn't really change our view on what we're doing. we're buying cheap assets, things like emerging market equities that's trading at 12 times earnings. >> but if he's right, all those assets can get a lot cheaper in the next three months. >> true, true. but what the fed is doing in terms of pumping ining liquidit the market. it's pretty supportive. >> why so pessimistic though? give us a partic
shareholder temasek, but weakness in energy majors offset gains on that market due to slumping oil prices overnight. japanese stocks pushed higher in late trade following the u.s. presidential debate where governor romney the pro business candidate appeared to outshine president obama. so the nikkei rebounded off a four week low with automakers and financials surging. but tech shares lost ground after hewlett-packard's profit warning. hp contract makers in taiwans also felt the pain with the computer share sub index losing 1.6%, but tmanaged to close fla. we saw a bit of profit taking on samsung electronics ahead of its q3 earnings guidance tomorrow. australian miners were lower, but banks lent support to the afx 200 ending at a 14 month high. weaker than expected august retail sales added to the case for further interest rate cuts. sensex stronger by 1% at the moment. >> let's pick it up with the european markets. equity to modest moves ahead of the bank of england rate decision. we'll have that for you live. louisa will help us figure out what's going on there. dax ahead of the ecb deci
including the fact that domestic energy production is way up under president obama. >> we heard about that in the debate in spite of instead of because of. >> not in spite of. the fact of the matter is president obama has reduced our dependence on foreign oil over these last few years, we've seen jobs created in the solar industry, in green industries. our state ranks fourth among the 50 states in terms of the number of jobs in the green sector so there are things we can and must do in order to make this recovery happen more quickly. but the fact of the matter is, not since 2005 have we had 30 months in a row of private sector job growth. we're seeing our housing industry coming back, with housing values rising in maryland, seven consecutive months on a year over year basis. so there are a lot of things we can do as a country, if we put job creation first, and that's what president obama has been doing, even in the face of obstructionists who are trying to slow the jobs recovery before the election. >> governor? >> that dog is trying its best to catch up with the fire truck but we kee
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19